Spurlock’s Newest: “POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold”

Posted by truecreek on April 25, 2011 under Opinions. Everyone has them. | Read the First Comment

Spurlock has done it again with “POM Wonderful Presents:  The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.”

As he did in “Super Size Me,”  Spurlock pulls you through the story, working hard to educate you on the nuances, verbiage and acronyms that are a critical part of the storyline. In this case, he’ decides to make a movie about product placement, financing it through product placement.  It’s just a hoot.

He gradually becomes a learned student of the process.  He makes one presentation after another to agencies and their clients, changing and adapting his pitch along the way. Finally, when he’s asked by one prospect “how much?’, he seems a bit taken aback at first.  Then he calmly spits out a fair, but low, number.

Many of the marketers he presented to seem to have been taken aback by his unpretentious nature in the meetings.  It’s was like like they were listening to their crazy brother or sister at the dinner table. You know what they are saying sounds weird, but than again….

You know he’s not trying to, but he makes more than a few of the marketers look pretty stupid in the process.  And I think that is one of the things I find most interesting about Spurlock; it’s his unpretentious nature. You just feel for the guy and know that he’s just trying to make things happen.  So what if he steps in it once in a while?

In one scene in the movie, he gets in the elevator after having pitched four or five great ideas to POM, only to be told that they would prefer another direction.  Of course, it’s the one that they have been thinking about since he last presented to them. His stuff didn’t have a chance.  How many times have we all been there?

This article from Ad Age speaks to the success Spurlock is having selling the movie.  But his success doesn’t surprise me.  He’s a great salesman. Perhaps he could offer versions of the movie as he adds more and more sponsors.  That’s how the industry would do it, right?

Read more about this in AdAge: